How you can influence the price of booze and taxes at the next Budget

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January 18, 2023, London, England, United Kingdom: Chancellor of the Exchequer JEREMY HUNT is seen leaving 10 Downing Street. 18 Jan 2023 Pictured: January 18, 2023, London, England, United Kingdom: Chancellor of the Exchequer JEREMY HUNT is seen leaving 10 Downing Street. Photo credit: ZUMAPRESS.com / MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342

JEREMY Hunt wants the public to help him come up with ideas for the March Budget.

The Treasury has put out an online survey where Brits can demand how the price of booze, cigarettes and fuel should change.

Jeremy Hunt has asked the public to help him come up with ideas for the Spring Budget on March 15

The Treasury advertised it’s Spring Budget survey on LinkedIn today

And the public can also demand the Chancellor slashes taxes.

A post on the Treasury LinkedIn account today encouraged Brits to “have your say” by “suggesting policy ideas” in the survey.

But it closes on February 1, so there’s only a week left to submit suggestions.

Despite requests for a helping hand, the the March 15 Budget is set to be bleak for hard-up Brits struggling with the cost of living crisis.

Ministers were recently warned that Britain’s medium-term economic outlook is even WORSE than expected.

In a private submission to the Treasury, the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) said growth will be slower than anticipated last year.

And the watchdog warned of a big black hole in the public purse, which could mean more cuts to public services are needed.

A Treasury source said: “There seems to be a view out there that Hunt suddenly has all this money to play with for tax cuts. But that is not the view internally.”

On Friday Mr Hunt is expected to rule out cutting tax at March’s Budget.

In a speech to bankers, Mr Hunt will set the stage for his set piece fiscal event, where he will say he “rejects the declinist narrative”.

Instead he will champion “high growth sectors” like life sciences, artificial intelligence, space and green tech where the UK has global standing.

But he risks a fresh row with Tory MPs, as sources say he will make clear there is “little to no headroom in the forecasts for giveaways.”

He will insist inflation has to fall further first, and any gain of tax cuts now would be lost in soaring prices.

A Treasury source said: “Jeremy will hammer home that he believes in low taxes and sound money, but sound money still comes first.”