Prince William shows off his right royal hook in charity boxing session while wearing suit

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The Prince of Wales boxing during a visit the Copper Box Arena in the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, east London, to take part in an event with Coach Core, which is celebrating its 10th anniversary. Picture date: Thursday October 13, 2022. PA Photo. The Royal Foundation launched the Coach Core charity programme in 2012, in response to the London riots and to contribute to the legacy ideals of the 2012 London Olympic and Paralympic Games. See PA story ROYAL Wales. Photo credit should read: Heathcliff O'Malley/Daily Telegraph/PA Wire

PRINCE William showed off his right hook in a charity boxing session while wearing his suit on royal duties.

The Prince and Princess of Wales travelled to the Copper Box Arena in the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in east London to take part in an event with Coach Core.

Prince William grinned as he got involved in a friendly boxing session

He cut a focused figure as he sparred with a trainer from Coach Core

And he showed off his right hook on the punching bag

They had come to the former London 2012 venue today to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the sports charity.

Wearing a dark navy suit and blue boxing gloves, the Prince of Wales was filmed throwing a few jabs at a heavy red punching bag.

And he then ramped up his workout by throwing a couple of big right hands in his formal attire.

Onlookers excitedly looked on as the Prince then engaged in some light sparring with another coach.

William seemed to be having fun too, smiling while bobbing and weaving as he kept his guard up against the Coach Core trainer.

Coach Core aims to create the next generation of sports coaches who will themselves go on to inspire their communities.

And the royal couple were captured beaming as they got involved with several young people associated with the charity and got a taste of some of the sports sessions offered.

William and Kate’s Royal Foundation launched the Coach Core programme the same year that the Olympic and Paralympic Games were staged in the capital to contribute to the legacy ideals of the events, and in response to the London riots.

Coach Core is now an independent charity which has supported more than 750 disadvantaged young people onto community sports coaching apprenticeships.

Gymnast Max Whitlock, a six-time Olympic medallist and a Coach Core ambassador, said: “We’re helping a lot more kids involved in sport by providing good coaches, good role models and (helping) these people into full-time employment – which is incredible.

“Two of the biggest problems in gymnastics – it’s the same in most sports – is space and coaches.

“Obviously Coach Core is trying to fulfil that need for more and more good quality coaches to support these children who are coming through.”